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One of Württemberg's late medieval palaces

Urach Residential Palace

Primus Truber, copper engraving, 1578. Image: Wikipedia, in the public domain
A Slovenian reformer exiled in Württemberg

Primus Truber

What Martin Luther was for Germany, Primus Truber (1508–1586) was for Slovenia. Both reformers translated the Bible into their native language. Truber, however, had to flee Slovenia and found exile in the Urach monastery, near the ducal residence.

Monument to Primus Truber in Bad Urach, the Amandus Church in the background. Image: Wikipedia, in the public domain

A staunch Protestant.

Who was the Slovenian reformer?

The Slovenian-born Truber was educated in Croatia and Austria before assuming his first parish, before even graduating. He took an interest in the Protestant ideology and preached it. Initially, this was met with displeasure from the responsible bishops and finally culminated in his excommunication in 1547. Subsequently, he had to leave Slovenia and flee to Württemberg.

Historical city view of Urach from the “Seehbuch” by Jakob Ramminger, 1596. Image: Landesmedienzentrum Baden-Württemberg

Truber took refuge in Urach.

Why did Truber come to Württemberg?

As early as 1534, the tide was already changing in Württemberg and Duke Ulrich had named Erhard Schnepf and Ambrosius Blarer as reformers. His son, Duke Christoph, continued these efforts and made rooms available for religious refugees in the Urach Monastery near the Urach Residential Palace. This is how the Protestant preacher, Primus Truber of Slovenia came to the monastery. He worked there as a translator.

Portrait of Baron Hans Ungnad von Sonegg. Image: Wikipedia, in the public domain

Baron Hans Ungnad financed a Christian print shop.

How did he contribute to the Reformation?

Truber met Baron Hans Ungnad von Sonegg at the Urach Monastery. The wealthy nobleman financed the establishment of a print shop in the monastery, so that Christian literature could be printed and distributed. The Slovenian, Croatian and Cyrillic print shop, also called the Urach Bible factory, published a translation, by none other than Primus Truber, of the “Augsburg Confession” in 1562/63 as well as other publications.

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